Homemade Lox (Salt-Cured Salmon)

Breakfast, Dinner, Fall, Lunch, Spring, Summer, Winter | January 24, 2017 | By

Who would have guessed that one of the most luxurious foods could be so simple to make? Homemade lox takes only 5 minutes of prep and a few days of hands-off time in the fridge to cure.

Homemade Lox (Salt-Cured Salmon)

Guys, I am in a funk. And it’s not like James Brown’s funk, or the Isley Brothers’ funk. It’s a very non-awesome, kind-of toxic, super-blarghy-ultra-screw-up-expialidocious…funk. I’m making uncharacteristically dumb mistakes at work, my sleep schedule is out the window, and all I can seem to do right is binge watching Grey’s Anatomy in bed covered in cats who, at times, seem dubious about my hygiene (understandably). And I completely blame the weather- no, really. We’ve been having major snow on and off in Portland since December, and Portland just plain doesn’t know how to deal with snow in amounts over 1-inch, so my workplace keeps shutting down. Between myriad snow closures and holiday off-times, I haven’t worked a full 40-hour week since just after Thanksgiving. I flourish when I am rooted in a predictable routine, and, clearly, I wilt when I am not.

That said, I am majorly blessed to have been paid for each day (granted, it was with my vacation time, which I did have earmarked for actual vacations), to have a home to keep me warm when there were literally people freezing to death in the streets, and humans and cats whom I love, and who love me unconditionally even when I am a gooey, pathetic lump of lethargy and sadness. Until I am fully re-rooted into my beautiful, predictably boring routine, I will be over here clinging to gratitude for dear life.

Homemade Lox (Salt-Cured Salmon)

Hey! You know what I didn’t screw up at all recently, though? My very first attempt at homemade lox. I know you’re skeptical, but making lox at home is completely idiot-proof. It requires no culinary skill whatsoever, or special ingredients of any kind. Even I, in my state of miserable incompetency outlined above, nailed perfect homemade lox on the first try. Whiz-bang!

Lox is, without a doubt, the sparkling jewel of the brunch world. It’s luxurious and beautiful, with silky texture and salty, briny flavor that just won’t quit. Whether you serve it with bagels and schmear, nestled into eggs benedict, or swaddled lovingly in an omelette or crepe- it’s a winner, it’s impressive, and darn it! It lives up to the hype. These are all really great reasons why you pay out the bum for mediocre lox at the store or deli. But what Big Lox doesn’t want you to know is that you’re good enough and smart enough to make it yourself for a fraction of the cost. Here’s what’s involved: First, buy some salmon- something with fatty-er stripes will yield the best texture, but this isn’t crucial. Stir together some salt, brown sugar, and a dash of liquid smoke (optional), and slather it all over the fish. Wrap in plastic and put in your fridge to cure. Five-ish days later, unwrap the fish, give it a thorough rinse and dry, and then eat your heart out. Presto… homemade lox!

Homemade Lox (Salt-Cured Salmon)

So easy, even a gooey, pathetic lump of lethargy and sadness can do it! 

Homemade Lox (Salt-Cured Salmon)
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Ingredients
  1. Salmon, skin on
Dry Brine (per pound of salmon)
  1. 1/4 c. kosher salt
  2. 1/4 c. brown sugar
  3. 1/2 t. liquid smoke (optional)
Instructions
  1. Gently press the surface of the salmon to check for pin bones- remove any you find. Pat salmon dry with paper towel, sprinkle with fresh black pepper.
  2. In a small bowl, stir together the salt, brown sugar, and liquid smoke (if using). Lay out a long sheet of plastic wrap and set the salmon in the center, skin-side down. Scoop salt mixture onto the salmon and evenly distribute. Wrap the salmon up in the plastic wrap, but don't fold the ends of the wrap over- leave them loose to let the juice escape during brining.
  3. Place the wrapped salmon in a baking sheet or dish and cover with a lid or more plastic wrap. Place in the fridge for 5 days, turning the salmon over once per day.
  4. After 5 days, unwrap the salmon and rinse under cool water until all traces of brine have washed away. Pat dry with paper towel. Use your sharpest knife to thinly slice the salmon across the grain, at a 45-degree angle.
http://www.humbledish.com/

Fool-Proof Thanksgiving Gravy from Drippings

Dinner, Fall, Sides, Winter | November 10, 2016 | By

Memorize this simple formula for chicken or turkey gravy from drippings and you’ll never have a gravy-emergency again! 


perfect thanksgiving gravy from drippings

You’ve done it: you’ve roasted the most picturesque, succulent chicken or turkey. Don’t let those savory drippings go to waste! Gravy from drippings is the best tasting gravy since the flavors have just spent hours developing and caramelizing in the oven- you just can’t get that from a jar or packet. And guess what! It’s just as easy. You’re just a few steps and a few minutes away from the perfect gravy.  

The recipe that I’m sharing with you was published by kitchn in 2014. I tweaked the cooking method somewhat and I also put the ingredients and quantities in terms of parts, rather than strict measurements, to allow for more flexibility depending on yield of drippings. Plus, it’s easier to memorize! All you need to remember is 1:1:4:4. 1 part fat, 1 part flour, 4 parts drippings, 4 parts broth. So for example, the beautiful and succulent thigh you see above comes from a 6 lb. chicken, which yielded about 2 T. fat and 1/2 c. drippings. This informed me to use 2 T. flour and 1/2 c. broth when making gravy.

Fool-Proof Thanksgiving Gravy from Drippings
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Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
10 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
10 min
Basic Formula (adjust depending on yield of drippings)
  1. 1 part turkey or chicken fat
  2. 1 part flour
  3. 4 parts pan drippings
  4. 4 parts turkey or chicken broth, plus extra to reach consistency, if needed
  5. salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. After roasting your bird, transfer to serving platter and cover loosely with foil to rest. Using a rubber spatula, scrape as much of the pan drippings and browned bits as you can into a clear glass measuring cup or dish.
  2. Place in the refrigerator for 5 minutes to allow fat to collect and float to the top (or just use a fat separator).
  3. Skim the fat from the top using a metal spoon and figure out how much you have to work with- compare to the basic gravy recipe, and adjust the other quantities accordingly. Heat the fat in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Add an equal amount of flour to the pan and stir to form a paste. Cook for 1-2 minutes.
  4. Add your pan drippings- this should be roughly 4-times the amount of fat you used for the roux, but you can compensate with broth in the next step if you have more or less. Whisk the pan drippings into the roux and continue whisking until thickened.
  5. Gradually whisk in broth- starting with an amount equal to the drippings you used. Whisk until thickened. Add more broth if needed to reach desired consistency.
  6. Taste, then season with salt and pepper as needed.
Adapted from kitchn
Adapted from kitchn
http://www.humbledish.com/

Sheet Pan Roasted Chicken and Fingerlings

Dinner, Fall, Winter | November 10, 2016 | By

The classic roasted chicken and potatoes dinner has never been easier or more delicious! Spatchcock-ing the bird reduces cooking time and makes for a coveted, crispy skin all over while fingerling potatoes caramelize in the juices. And it all takes place on one sheet pan.


Crispy Roasted Chicken and Fingerlings on a Sheet Pan

Blessed mother of crispy skin- I am SO EXCITED to share this recipe with you today. I’ve done it. I have conquered the roasted chicken, and it is crispy, and juicy, and perfect, and EASY. For a long time, I avoided roasting my own chicken- I just didn’t see the point when I could buy a fresh rotisserie chicken and call it a day. I still have great respect for the rotisserie chicken as a shortcut to things like chicken pot pie and chicken noodle soup.  I guess I just didn’t know how good a homemade roasted chicken could be. Now I do, and it took every ounce of marital devotion I have within me to not eat all of that beautiful skin myself in 8 seconds.

Crispy Roasted Chicken and Fingerlings on a Sheet Pan

This all-in-one dinner has so much going for it. I went for a rotisserie-style rub featuring a large heap of one of my favorite-favorite secret ingredients, smoked paprika, which gives the insanely crispy skin its deep flavor and color. Lemon slices under the spatchcocked chicken keep the undercarriage moist during roasting and the flavor bright and mouth-watering. Halved fingerling potatoes are added to the sheet pan midway through roasting the chicken, and caramelize in the tantalizing pan juices. It all happens on one pan, which makes cleanup a snap. I love that part.

So, what the heck is spatchcock? Well, it’s a bit creepy, really. What you do is set the raw chicken on its belly and snip out the entire spine along both sides using kitchen shears. Then you roll that baby open, breast side up, and press down to flatten. Why on earth should you do this? Because in doing so, it increases the surface area, which has three incredible benefits: A) no truss, no fuss B) all of the skin faces up, so all of the skin gets crispy, C) cooking time is vastly reduced, which D) keeps the meat moist as heck. Here’s a step-by-step:

Crispy Roasted Chicken and Fingerlings on a Sheet Pan

It’s mid-November and so I know what you’re thinking- can I do this to a turkey? Yes, yes you can! Some great tips on cooking times and carving a spatchcock turkey can be found here, on Serious Eats.

Now, I am decided that this chicken is perfectly perfect without gravy…BUT, you will have just enough pan juices after roasting to whip up a quick and easy pan gravy. It’s not needed, but it really takes it over the top. So there it is! My new favorite family dinner, my gift to you, just in time for your weekend grocery shopping (and Thanksgiving!).

Crispy Roasted Chicken and Fingerlings on a Sheet Pan

Sheet Pan Roasted Chicken and Fingerlings
Serves 4
The classic roasted chicken and potatoes dinner has never been easier or more delicious! Spatchcock-ing the bird reduces cooking time and makes for a coveted, crispy skin all over while fingerling potatoes caramelize in the juices. And it all takes place on one sheet pan.
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 15 min
Ingredients
  1. 5 to 6 lb. whole roasting chicken
  2. 3 T. olive oil, divided
  3. salt and pepper
  4. 2 t. smoked paprika
  5. 1/2 t. garlic powder
  6. 1/2 t. onion powder
  7. 1/2 t. chili powder
  8. 1/8 t. cayenne pepper
  9. 1 lemon, sliced in 1/4" rounds
  10. 1 lb. fingerling potatoes (or other small yellow or red potatoes)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 F degrees. Combine smoked paprika, garlic powder, onion powder, chili powder, and cayenne pepper in a small bowl. Set aside.
  2. Rinse chicken with cool water, inside and out, and dry thoroughly with paper towels. Lay breast-side down on a clean surface (I cut up a paper grocery bag so it lays flat, and then throw away after prepping chicken). Using a sharp pair of kitchen shears, snip along one side of the spine from end to end. Repeat on other side of spine, then discard spine or save for stock. Flip chicken over, breast-side up. Use your hands to press down on the breasts until the chicken lays flat.
  3. Drizzle chicken with 2 T. olive oil and spread around entire outer surface of chicken. Season chicken evenly with salt and pepper, then apply spice mixture evenly all over the skin (don't forget the arm-pits).
  4. Arrange lemon slices in a circle (roughly the size of your chicken) in the middle of a rimmed sheet pan or cookie sheet. Transfer seasoned chicken on top of lemon slices.
  5. Roast chicken for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, slice the fingerling potatoes in half and toss with remaining 1 T. olive oil. Pull the chicken out of the oven after 30 minutes. Use a pastry brush to baste the skin with rendered pan juices. Arrange potatoes on the sheet pan, cut-side down, around the chicken. Roast for another 30-35 minutes, or until chicken's internal temperature reaches 165 degrees.
  6. Transfer chicken and potatoes to a serving platter and cover loosely with foil and rest 10 minutes before serving.
http://www.humbledish.com/

Roasted Mushroom and Brie Soup

Dinner, Fall, Lunch, Winter | October 27, 2016 | By

Classic and comforting creamy mushroom soup gets an update with the addition of roasted mushroom, plenty of white wine, and brie.


 creamy roasted mushroom brie soup

Today I share with you a soup recipe that is an adaptation of a recipe published by Closet Cooking back in 2014. It’s incredible.

A really sad thing happened to me recently- strolling through Pinterest for ideas I happened upon a promising-looking roasted mushroom and brie soup. I made it twice and was so happy with it that I took to leaving an absolutely glowing and ecstatic review on the food blog where I found it. Afterward, a few days ago, I stumbled across another roasted mushroom brie soup on Closet Cooking, which had the exact same ingredients and quantities and cooking methods- but it was posted an entire year earlier than the version I had seen first. I returned to the first recipe that had received my accolades, for comparison and to check for credit, and it immediately became clear to me that that blogger, who shall remain nameless because I am kind, ripped off Closet Cooking without giving credit where it was due, and passed it off as their own work.

It really buttered my biscuits. Because I am still relatively new at this, I look to established food bloggers as examples of best practices. And I guess that I naively imagined that we are all rooting for one another, tied harmoniously by our love of food and our shared efforts. It was kind of like learning Santa isn’t real. Not to mention that Kevin Lynch over at Closet Cooking has been working tirelessly for years to create and post over 2,000 recipes for our free enjoyment, and I think he deserves a lot of credit for carving out such a vast place on the internet. If you’re unfamiliar with Closet Cooking, please go pay him a visit! I have been following his blog on and off for many years, and if someday down the road I ever have forged enough of a presence as a blogger that it came to my attention that he had even visited my blog, I would be just tickled to death.

When it comes to recipe blogging, there is so much gray area with this stuff. While I strive hard to create totally new and unique recipes, sometimes I do, and sometimes I don’t- the truth is that pretty much everything has been done before. And we bloggers, like you, mine for recipes and inspiration from other bloggers. In fact, most recipes you’ll find on cooking blogs like mine have been adapted from someone else’s work- it’s all part of a greater and fundamentally lovely and open-source conversation about home cooking. It connects us by our shared passion, and it’s a good thing! However, the hope is that each blogger has enough integrity to credit and link to the creator, but the sad truth is that bloggers rip each other off all the time, passing things off as their own. Sometimes, they even profit from it. The realm of food blogs is so over-saturated that it is just an internet-version of the old, wild west- this kind of sad, cheating behavior is to be expected, I have come to learn. All of the recipes that I post that are adapted from other bloggers’ recipes will have a statement saying so at the bottom of the recipe card, and a link to the original. But maybe I should start being even more obvious about it!

creamy roasted mushroom brie soup

That’s all the righteous idignation I have for today. Let’s talk about this soup because I am cold! I love this roasted mushroom and brie soup- it is so creamy and satisfying without being heavy, and it is even better the next day as leftovers. How often does that happen? If you’re a longtime fan of mushroom soups like I am, then you’re going to fall in love with the addition of the white wine and melty, funky brie- it tickles the taste buds and gives the whole thing an undeniable air of luxury. 

The thing I find the most unique about it is the added initial step of roasting the mushrooms- it gives them a satisfying meaty chew, and the caramelization that comes from roasting them first gives the overall flavor oodles of depth and complexity. It’s a step that you most definitely do not want to skip!

creamy roasted mushroom brie soup

 Adaptations that I made to this soup include doubling the quantities of the white wine and the brie (hello…native Wisconsite, here), and tweaking a few other amounts. Also, instead of blending all of the roasted mushrooms up into the soup, I reserve half of them to leave intact and add at the end. I like to have something to chew on!

That’s it for this week- hope you’re all enjoying your life and being affectionate toward your loved ones and eating delicious things!

Roasted Mushroom and Brie Soup
Serves 4
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
1 hr
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
1 hr
Ingredients
  1. 1 1/2 lb. cremini or button mushrooms, quartered
  2. 1 T. olive oil
  3. 2 T. butter
  4. 1 medium yellow onion, roughly diced
  5. 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  6. 1 t. fresh thyme leaves, chopped once or twice
  7. 2 T. flour
  8. 1 c. dry white wine
  9. 4 c. low sodium vegetable broth
  10. 7-8 oz. brie, cut into chunks
  11. 1/2 c. heavy cream
  12. salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Toss the quartered mushrooms with olive oil in a large bowl, then spread evenly on a cookie sheet. Roast for 15 minutes, then toss, then continue roasting for another 15 minutes, or until mushrooms are firm and caramelized.
  3. After flipping the mushrooms and returning them to the oven, melt the butter in a large pot or dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onions and cook until translucent, about 5 minutes.
  4. Add the garlic and thyme and stir for 1 minute, then sprinkle in the flour. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 1 minute.
  5. Pour in the wine and use a wooden spoon to scrape and deglaze the bottom of the pot. Stir and scrape continuously until wine thickens. Pour in the broth.
  6. When mushrooms have finished roasting, add just half of them to the pot of broth. Set the rest aside. Bring the soup to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes.
  7. Reduce heat again to low. Add brie chunks and stir until melted. The bits of rind will not melt, but will float to the top. Use a slotted spoon to remove them and discard.
  8. Puree the soup using a stick blender (or transfer to regular blender) until texture is even. Add the remaining mushrooms and the cream and stir to combine.
  9. Season with salt and pepper and serve.
Adapted from Closet Cooking
Adapted from Closet Cooking
http://www.humbledish.com/

Pork Potstickers & Sweet Soy Dipping Sauce

pork potstickers | humbledish.com

I’ve been making pork potstickers for family and friends for years- they have always been improvised and slightly unique each time, and I never wrote the recipe down until I prepared the little dumplins you see pictured before you. We took a long camping weekend up in Washington last month with some loved ones where I was reminded by Ben’s cousin Alex that I once made these potstickers for him several years ago, long before we all migrated to our respective corners of the Pacific Northwest. He told me emphatically that they were so delicious that he has since never forgotten about them. It warmed my heart! The whiskey helped, too. 

DSC03273_e

My love language is food. This is in no small part due to warm and snuggly memories I have of making jello poke cake and elephant ears and cinnamon rolls with my grandma in her tiny kitchen as a wee lass. I like to think that love is evident in the foods I prepare (with the exception, perhaps, of these scones, which made me stabby). Potstickers, especially, are truly a labor of love- every comforting bite was once cradled gently in the hand of the person who lovingly crafted them, one-by-one. This is a very sly and sentimental way of disclosing to you that they are not fast to prepare, and there’s some technique to learn. 

There are upsides to potstickers’ laborious, two-bite construction. They can be prepared in bulk for future convenience- I usually make about 100 at a time (double the recipe below). And they freeze just marvelously- that way whenever you need them, you can open your freezer and grab a handful or a lot. They don’t need to thaw and they take just ten minutes to fry/steam straight from the freezer, so you can have them for dinner, lunch, snack, elevenses, party-time (what is that), or whenever hunger strikes. I don’t exaggerate how quick and easy they are to heat up- I have been enjoying fresh, crunchy, and piping-hot potstickers on my hour lunch-break all week. I am living the dream, you guys!

pork potstickers | humbledish.com

Flavor-wise, these pork potstickers have got it all. Each dumpling is a magical parcel bursting at the seams with mouthwatering umami flavors of ground pork, shiitake mushrooms and sesame oil. They’re salty and spicy and crunchy and addicting, and you are going to love them. They’re perfectly complemented by the dipping sauce included with this recipe- sweet brown sugar, salty soy, and the zip of plenty of sambal oelek. Do not neglect to make the sauce- it comes together really fast on the stove and there’s plenty to keep in the fridge until your potsticker-stash is depleted. 

pork potstickers | humbledish.com

So here it is! My very own pork potstickers- written down, at long last, hurled joyfully into the ether, so they can be shared and loved forever and ever, amen. 

Pork Potstickers with Sweet Soy Dipping Sauce
Yields 50
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Prep Time
1 hr
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
1 hr 10 min
Prep Time
1 hr
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
1 hr 10 min
Potstickers
  1. 2 t. sesame oil
  2. 4 oz. shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and finely diced
  3. 1 lb. ground pork
  4. 1 t. freshly grated ginger
  5. 1 clove garlic, grated or minced
  6. 2 T. soy sauce
  7. 1 t. chili paste (sambal oelek or sriracha)
  8. 2 scallions, thinly sliced
  9. 2 c. coleslaw mix, roughly chopped to break up long pieces
  10. 2 T. cornstarch, divided (plus extra for dusting)
  11. 1/4 c. warm water
  12. 50-60 potsticker wrappers
  13. vegetable oil, for frying
  14. 1/4 c. water
Dipping Sauce
  1. 1 c. brown sugar
  2. 1/2 c. soy sauce
  3. 2 t. sesame oil
  4. 1 T. chili paste
Potstickers
  1. Heat sesame oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add diced shiitakes and saute until softened. Set aside.
  2. Combine pork, ginger, garlic, soy sauce, chili paste, scallions, coleslaw mix, and 1 T. cornstarch in a large bowl. Add the shiitake mushrooms and work with your hands until everything is evenly incorporated. Refrigerate while you prepare to fold the potstickers.
  3. Mix together 1 T. cornstarch with warm water. Dust a large cookie sheet or tray liberally with cornstarch. Queue up Gilmore Girls on Netflix.
  4. Working over a clean cutting board, place a small spoonful (about 2 t.) of filling in the center of the wrapper. Dip a finger into the cornstarch slurry and apply around the edges of the wrapper. Fold the bottom and top edges over the middle of the filling, pinch together, and pleat the sides toward the center to seal. Place on the prepared cookie sheet, pleated edge pointing up, and repeat until out of filling.
  5. At this point, you can freeze the potstickers (see notes below) or cover with damp paper towels and refrigerate until ready to use.
Dipping Sauce
  1. Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Set aside to cool.
Fry/Steam the Potstickers
  1. Grab your largest non-stick skillet and lid. Coat the bottom of the pan with vegetable oil and heat to medium-high. Arrange potstickers evenly in hot pan, pleats pointing up, leaving a little space between each one. Fry undisturbed for 5 minutes, or until bottoms are golden brown.
  2. Pour in water and cover the pan. Steam for 5 minutes (or 7 minutes if frozen).
  3. Uncover and cook off the remaining water for 1 minute.
  4. Serve hot with dipping sauce.
Notes
  1. *Dipping sauce recipe yields about 10 oz. of sauce- reduce recipe if desired. It keeps great in the refrigerator.
  2. *If freezing the potstickers, it's best to freeze them on the cookie sheet covered loosely with cling wrap, and then you can transfer them to a ziplock bag when fully frozen- this keeps them separated so you can grab however many you want later. No need to thaw before using- just follow the directions as above and expect them to take a few extra minutes to brown on the bottom before steaming.
http://www.humbledish.com/

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Burrito Bowls with Fresh Peach-Corn Salsa

Dinner, Lunch, Summer | July 26, 2016 | By

sweet potato burrito bowls

Have you been to the farmers market lately? What a glorious bounty of magnificent produce we are graced with right now. Sour cherries! Figs! Rainbow carrots! Stone fruits galore! It is truly a great time to be alive and eating! Out of all of nature’s summer treasures, I anxiously await peaches and corn the most. Corn holds serious nostalgia for me as a native midwesterner- to me, it has always been a delicious signal that summertime is in full swing. And here we are. It’s late July, the corn stalks are well past knee-high, and caravans of peach trucks are making their way up from Georgia (actually, we have pretty good peaches in Oregon, too!).

sweet potato burrito bowls

At the intersection of peach season and corn season, you will find this remarkably tasty and addictive and mega-healthy sweet potato and black bean burrito bowl with fresh peach and corn salsa. I tried out this recipe from Cook Nourish Bliss last summer, and then I made it again and again and again, and then I pined for it all winter long. It has been waiting quietly on my blog post list since- I have been so wanting to share this recipe with you!

You’re going to love this burrito bowl because it has so many flavors and textures going for it- the soft and creamy charred sweet potato and black bean mixture brings heat, depth, and smoke while the juicy and crunchy peach-corn salsa counters that and offers relief from the spicy chipotle pepper. It’s all wrapped together with avocado (hopefully yours is greener than mine!) on the side and always-welcome cilantro lime rice. I think it’s the perfect counter-balance of both textures and flavors that makes this a slam-dunk. Oh yeah, and it’s vegan!

sweet potato burrito bowls

My only departure from the original recipe is that I take the avocado out of the salsa and put it on the side- this allows for the possibility of leftovers (however unlikely), without scummy brown avocado the next day. The salsa would be incredible on its own with chips!

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Burrito Bowls with Fresh Peach-Corn Salsa
Serves 4
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
35 min
Total Time
50 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
35 min
Total Time
50 min
For the Rice
  1. 1 c. brown rice, rinsed
  2. 1 3/4 c. water
  3. 1/4 t. salt
  4. 1/4 c. chopped cilantro
  5. zest of 1 lime
  6. juice of 1 lime
For the Salsa
  1. 3 medium peaches, chopped
  2. 2 ears fresh corn, raw, kernels removed
  3. 1/4 c. minced red onion
  4. 1 jalapeno, seeded and minced
  5. 1/2 c. chopped cilantro
  6. juice of 1 lime
  7. 1/4 t. salt
For the Sweet Potatoes
  1. 2 T. olive oil
  2. 1 small red onion, chopped
  3. 2 cloves garlic, minced
  4. 2 medium sweet potatoes, cut into 1/2" chunks (leave skin on, or peel- whatever you like)
  5. 1-2 T. minced chipotle peppers in adobo sauce (start with 1 T., adjust to your spice-preference)
  6. salt and pepper
  7. 1/2 c. vegetable broth
  8. 1 (15 oz.) can black beans, drained and rinsed
For Serving
  1. 1 avocado, sliced
For the Rice
  1. Add rice, water, and salt in a saucepan. Bring to boil, cover, and reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer 35 minutes.
  2. Remove from heat, leave covered, and let stand 5-10 minutes.
  3. Stir in the cilantro, lime zest, and lime juice just before serving.
For the Salsa
  1. Mix peaches, raw corn kernels, onion, jalapeno, cilantro, lime juice, and salt in a bowl. Stir to combine then set aside.
For the Sweet Potatoes
  1. Heat olive oil in large skillet over medium heat. When hot, add onion and cook for a few minutes, until starting to soften. Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Add sweet potatoes and chipotle peppers. Season everything with salt and pepper and stir. Cover and cook for 5 minutes, tossing halfway through.
  2. Add the vegetable broth, stir, and re-cover. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are softened and caramelized. If skillet becomes dry, add another splash of broth.
  3. Add the black beans to the skillet and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes, or until beans are warmed through. Remove from heat.
To Serve
  1. Portion the rice into four bowls. Top with sweet potatoes/beans, salsa, and avocado slices.
Adapted from Cook Nourish Bliss
http://www.humbledish.com/

Veggie Pasta with Vegan Avocado Basil Cream Sauce

Dinner, Lunch, Spring, Summer | July 11, 2016 | By

Veggie Pasta with Vegan Avocado Cream Sauce

How is your summer going? Are you grilling out a lot? Are you wearing enough sunscreen? Did you go see the fireworks on Monday? Are you sitting in a stale, air-conditioned office from 8-5 every day wondering how it is that you have no recollection of June ever coming and going? So far I have found myself primarily in the latter scenario, but I am grateful to be on the cusp of a vacation. I’m drafting this post ahead of time as part of my pre-vaycay preps- but by the time this post auto-publishes and you read it, I should be (hopefully) floating carelessly on a lake, slathered in SPF 1000, and taking in some rural peace and quiet. We’re headed back to our place of origin, Wisconsin, where nobody does summer better. In anticipation of all the charred sausages and pasta salads and corn on the cob and snicker apple salad (google it) that I expect to subsist on for the week, I present this week’s dish: A bright and summery, yet creamy and comforting, pasta with fresh english peas, spinach, and a you-have-to-taste-it-to-believe-it raw vegan avocado basil cream sauce. 

Veggie Pasta with Vegan Avocado Cream Sauce

The sauce, adapted from Damn Delicious, truly could not be easier- you literally throw everything in a blender while the pasta is boiling and blitz until smooth. The peas and spinach join the pasta for the last few seconds in the pot, and then it’s all drained, then tossed with the sauce, and you’re done! What we have here is a 15 minute comfort meal, that doesn’t heat up the house, that doesn’t take a lot of prep, and is relatively healthy. Add this to your summer meal rotation… stat! 

If you’re wondering where on earth to find fresh peas and you already missed the farmers market for the week, you can get them at Trader Joe’s, or you can use frozen (no shame in frozen peas!). Let’s see a close-up of those happy little peas!

Veggie Pasta with Vegan Avocado Cream Sauce

Veggie Pasta with Vegan Avocado Basil Cream Sauce
Serves 4
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Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
15 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 8 oz. pasta (whatever is your favorite shape!)
  2. 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  3. juice of 1 lemon (about 2 T. juice)
  4. 1/2 cup packed fresh basil
  5. 2 large avocados, peeled and pitted
  6. 1/2 c. hot pasta water (grab it while the pasta boils)
  7. 1/4 c. olive oil
  8. 1 c. fresh or frozen peas
  9. 2 c. fresh spinach leaves
Instructions
  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Cook pasta according to directions.
  2. While the pasta boils, combine garlic, lemon juice, basil, and avocados in blender or food processor. Add a 1/2 c. of hot water from your pasta pot. Blend until smooth. While the blender is still going, drizzle in the olive oil in a slow stream. Set aside.
  3. Add the peas to the pasta pot for the last minute of cooking. Toss in spinach, stir, then drain pasta immediately.
  4. Return the pasta to the empty pot and add the sauce. Toss to combine and then serve.
Notes
  1. If there is one downside to this recipe, it is that leftovers do not store well. It is avocado, after all. Scale this up or down as needed!
Adapted from Damn Delicious
Adapted from Damn Delicious
http://www.humbledish.com/

Portobello Banh Mi

Dinner, Lunch, Spring, Summer | June 28, 2016 | By

Portobello Banh Mi | humbledish.com

Gosh golly, I have really been meaning to post this portobello banh mi for a while now. Perhaps life has gotten in the way a bit, and perhaps I just eat them way too fast whenever I make them. Who knows? (Me. I know.)

I inhaled my very first Vietnamese banh mi sandwich sometime around a year ago- I remember that it was from Lela’s Bistro on NW 23rd and it was filled with pork belly, which had beautiful and succulent layers of fat that first crackled and then melted in my mouth as I ate it (and then I melted). And then I decided that I would honestly prefer not to eat anything but banh mi sandwiches for the rest of my days. Since that fateful sandwich, I have been on a sort of banh mi tour of west Portland. In my mind, I collect data from each sandwich, mentally listing and frankenstein-ing and adding up to the perfect conceivable version.

Portobello Banh Mi | humbledish.com

On this journey I have concluded that the most crucial element that makes it or breaks it is not the meat in the sandwich, and it’s not the pickles or veggies- it’s the baguette! Since I started making my own banh mi at home, I have learned that the quickest way to ruin it is to use a good baguette. Those rustic, chewy, glutenous baguettes you find on the fancy side of the bakery by the olive bar are absolute garbage here. What’s needed is something with a tender, yielding crumb and a thin, crackling crust. Go for the cheap, yellow-ish, shiny-crusted second-cousin of a baguette, over by the donuts. A lot of my favorite things are found by the donuts. Mainly, other donuts.

While traditional Vietnamese banh mi are most often stuffed with pate and some form of charred pork product (though fusions stuffed with Korean bulgogi and kimchi are equally amazing), and while I certainly enjoy eating the meaty varieties, I prepare my own meatless rendition at home to cut down on cost, fat, and effort. I once again employ the mighty portobello mushroom as a very acceptable stand-in for the meat, and honestly, I find it just as much of a pleasure to eat. Thick slices of portobello are marinated in soy, fish sauce, and a few other flavors and then oven roasted. The warm strips are stuffed into a soft baguette, along with mayo, quick-pickled carrot, cucumbers, scallions, and cilantro. The whole thing tastes marvelously fresh and balanced, with a wonderful variety of textures and colors. 

Portobello Banh Mi | humbledish.com

Definitely licked some mayo off my lens focus ring during this shoot, by the way.

Portobello Banh Mi
Serves 2
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
For Mushrooms
  1. 2 large portobello caps (look for firm and thick)
  2. 1/2 c. water
  3. 3 T. soy sauce
  4. 2 T. rice vinegar
  5. 2 T. brown sugar
  6. 1 T. fish sauce
  7. 1 T. sesame oil
  8. 1 t. ground ginger
  9. 1/2 t. liquid smoke
  10. pinch red pepper flakes
For Quick-Pickled Carrots
  1. 1 carrot, peeled into ribbons with veggie peeler
  2. 1/2 c. warm water
  3. 2 T. rice vinegar
  4. 1 T. sugar
  5. 1 t. salt
For Toppings/Assembly
  1. 1 cucumber, 1/4" julienne strips
  2. 1 scallion, cut to 4" lengths, then julienne
  3. handful cilantro, torn
  4. 2 6" pieces soft baguette (or 2 baguette rolls), sliced open
  5. mayo
  6. sriracha or hot pepper slices (optional)
For Mushrooms
  1. Preheat oven to 375. Trim stems from mushroom caps, then slice caps into 1/2" strips. Place in a large glass baking dish in an even (if not single) layer.
  2. Whisk together soy sauce, rice vinegar, brown sugar, fish sauce, sesame oil, ginger, liquid smoke, and red pepper flakes. Pour over the mushroom slices.
  3. Bake 10 minutes. Flip, bake another 10 minutes.
  4. Remove from oven. Using a colander, carefully drain off all liquid, then return mushroom slices to baking dish in an even layer. Bake an additional 10-15 minutes, or until browned.
For Quick-Pickled Carrots
  1. Place carrot ribbons in a jar or storage container.
  2. Whisk together the water, rice vinegar, sugar, and salt. Pour over carrot ribbons. Set aside.
For Assembly
  1. Spread a thin layer of mayo all over the inside of each baguette. Add sriracha if you want!
  2. Fill baguettes with warm portobello slices, pickled carrots, cucumbers, green onions, and cilantro.
Notes
  1. Any remaining carrot pickles will keep in the fridge for up to a week- they'll get more pickle-y the longer they sit.
http://www.humbledish.com/

Crab Cake Sliders with Kimchi

Crab Cake Sliders with Kimchi

If you’re an Oregonian I don’t need to explain anything to you about Rogue Brewery, but to my Wisconsin readership- should you ever happen upon a bottle of their Hazelnut Brown Nectar in your parts, it is recommended that you set aside your fierce (and justified) loyalties, just for a moment, and snatch it up quick. Besides being one of Oregon’s most beloved local breweries, Rogue also serves pretty solid bar fare at their brick-and mortar pubs. Really- their tots are no joke. These crab cake sliders are inspired by my favorite small plate at my neighborhood’s Rogue pub. In creating this recipe, I am keeping with their simple concept of crab cakes, kimchi, and mayo on sweet rolls. However, sorry-not-sorry, Rogue… mine win big, hands-down.

Crab Cake Sliders with Kimchi

You see, while there are certainly occasions for the imitation stuff, you just cannot beat fresh, lump dungeness crab. We’re doing this right, food-fans. A truly great slider is like an amouse-bouche. It must have, in its tiny package, all flavor groups represented to achieve maximum tantalization. The kimchi brings tang, spice, and funk, aided by the salty umami flavor in the fish sauce- and it’s all hugged together by the sweetness of the Hawaiian rolls and the high-quality dungeness crab. 

The cakes themselves are worthy of standing all alone (and they certainly shall in my future, with a dipping sauce)- crunchy and light and true perfection. Please look away as I self-five a thousand times, and proceed to the recipe below.

Crab Cake Sliders with Kimchi

Crab Cake and Kimchi Sliders
Serves 4
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
45 min
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
45 min
crab cakes
  1. 2 egg whites
  2. 1 T. fish sauce
  3. 1 T. fresh ginger, finely grated
  4. 1 scallion, thinly sliced
  5. 1/4 c. finely chopped cilantro
  6. 2 T. corn starch
  7. 8 oz. lump dungeness crab, squeezed and drained
  8. 1 c. panko bread crumbs, divided
  9. canola or vegetable oil, for frying
for serving
  1. 12 Hawaiian rolls
  2. mayonnaise
  3. kimchi
  4. cilantro leaves
Instructions
  1. In a mixing bowl, lightly beat the egg whites. Whisk in fish sauce, ginger, scallion, cilantro, and corn starch.
  2. Add 1/4 c. of the panko and the crab meat to the bowl, and gently fold together until just combined. Chill in the refrigerator 15 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, separate the rolls and slice in half. Set aside.
  4. Fill a large, deep saute pan with 1/2" of oil and heat to medium high.
  5. Pour remaining 3/4 c. panko onto a plate or shallow dish.
  6. Retrieve crab mixture and divide into 12 blobs. To form the cakes roll each blob into a ball, place on top of panko plate, and cover with a handful of panko. Gently press down to form a patty and adhere the panko to the top and bottom. Put on a plate and continue.
  7. When all cakes are formed and oil is hot, fry in batches of 3 or 4 until golden brown on both sides. Drain on paper towels.
  8. To assemble, spread a thin layer of mayo on the bottom halves of the rolls. Layer cilantro leaves on next, then crab cake, then a fork-full of kimchi, and the bun-tops. Eat them while they're hot!
http://www.humbledish.com/

Cilbir (Turkish Eggs in Yogurt)

Breakfast, Dinner | April 15, 2016 | By

Cilbir (Turkish Eggs in Yogurt)

Cilbir (pronounced “chil-ber”) is a Turkish dish of poached eggs over garlicky yogurt with spiced clarified butter. You eat it with a generous side of crusty bread, which functions as a delicious utensil. It may sound like an odd combination to we lowly peasants, but this rich and wholesome dish has actually been scarfed up by hungry Ottoman sultans for hundreds of years- historians trace it back as far as the 15th century! I googled this and I totally believe it because I’ve eaten it and felt pretty darned royal afterward.Cilbir (Turkish Eggs in Yogurt)

You can enjoy this for breakfast or dinner. Whenever you eat it, when you scoop this onto your crusty bread, you’re going to find that the suppleness of the poached egg meets the creaminess of the Greek yogurt to create the silkiest, most luxurious texture imaginable. The richness of the runny yolk is offset perfectly by the tang of the yogurt and the subtle, nuanced spice of the butter. It is, without a doubt, one of the most comforting foods I have ever eaten. Not to mention beautiful!

I usually go for two large chicken eggs per plate. On the day I shot this, my husband had gifted me with two gigantic, fresh duck eggs from the farmers market (isn’t he something?), which you see here. I don’t know if it was the freshness of the eggs or if the duck-ness makes a difference, but they poached just marvelously! 

Cilbir (Turkish Eggs in Yogurt)

Cilbir is pretty much everything I want this blog to be about: humble, accessible ingredients combining in creative ways. I want to promote simple recipes that wow and satisfy, and I think this nails it! I hope you’re intrigued!

Cilbir (Turkish Eggs in Yogurt)
Serves 2
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Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
20 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 garlic cloves
  2. salt
  3. 1 c. full fat Greek yogurt, at room temperature
  4. 1/2 t. tahini
  5. 4 T. unsalted butter
  6. 1/2 t. paprika
  7. 1/8 t. turmeric
  8. pinch cayenne pepper
  9. 4 large eggs
  10. Crusty bread, sliced thick
  11. 1 T. olive oil
Instructions
  1. Finely mince 1 clove garlic and sprinkle with salt. Use the flat of your knife to mash the garlic and salt into a paste (alternatively, use a microplane to grate the garlic into a paste, then add salt). Scrape into a bowl and add the yogurt and tahini. Stir well to combine, then put aside.
  2. Melt butter over medium-low heat in a small saucepan. Add the paprika, turmeric, cayenne, and a pinch of salt and stir. Once butter begins to sizzle, remove from heat and pour into a small bowl or pyrex measuring cup. Set aside.
  3. Heat a large pot of water to boiling. Reduce heat to medium to bring water to a gentle simmer. Poach the eggs until firm whites/runny yolks. Using a slotted spoon, carefully remove eggs from the pot and place in a bowl of warm water until ready to serve.
  4. Turn on your broiler. Lightly brush one side of each slice of bread with olive oil and then place on a baking sheet. Broil the bread until toasted and golden brown.
  5. Cut second garlic clove in half, and then rub the cut side of one of the halves onto the surface of the toasts.
  6. To serve, plop the yogurt onto two plates or shallow bowls. Spread out slightly then top with the eggs. Drizzle or spoon the butter over everything, but avoid picking up the spices that have settled on the bottom.
Adapted from HapaNomNom
Adapted from HapaNomNom
http://www.humbledish.com/